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Image of Christ in Modern Art

Image of Christ in Modern Art
This book explores the challenges presented by the radical and rapid changes of artistic style in the twentieth century to artists who wished to relate to traditional Christian imagery. Richard Harries thus explores the continuing challenge, present from the beginning of Christian art, as to how that which is visual can in some way indicate the transcendent.
Our Price: £22.99
ISBN/EAN: 9781409463825
Stock: 0
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing Group
Author: Richard Harries
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In this highly illustrated book, Richard Harries looks at some of the artists associated with the birth of modernism such as Epstein and Rouault as well as those with a highly distinctive understanding of religion such as Chagall and Stanley Spencer. He discusses the revival of confidence associated with the rebuilding of Coventry Cathedral after World War II and the commissioning of work by artists like Henry Moore, Graham Sutherland and John Piper before looking at the very testing last quarter of the 20th century. He shows how here, and even more in our own time, fresh and important visual interpretations of Christ have been created both by well known and less well known artists. In conclusion he suggests that the modern movement in art has turned out to be a friend, not a foe of Christian art.Through a wide and beautiful range of images and insightful text, Harries explores the continuing challenge, present from the beginning of Christian art, as to how that which is visual can in some way indicate the transcendent.
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